Home 2014 Rochester MN bouquets

2014 Rochester MN bouquets

Whether you can envision every last petal or don’t know where to begin, a talented florist can make your wedding flower dreams come true.

GATHER YOUR IDEAS

Succulents, white hydrangea, white lisianthus, antique gold brooches. Created by Flowers by Jerry.

Succulents, white hydrangea, white lisianthus, antique gold brooches. Created by Flowers by Jerry.

Communication is key; so make sure you are comfortable discussing ideas with your florist. Jessica Pearson, of Flowers by Jerry, suggests securing your ceremony and reception sites and deciding on your wedding color palette as a first step. That way, your florist has a better idea of what will and won’t work for you. Jessica Miers, of Le Jardin Floral, starts her consultations with a checklist and an hour-long conversation.

Pinterest is a terrific starting place for inspiration on many aspects of a wedding, including flowers. “Nearly every one of my bridal consults this year started and ended with my brides bringing in their laptops, iPads, and cell phones with their Pinterest account, and pinning nonstop,” says Tina Welke of T. Welke & Company. Pinterest has made a difference in the variety of choices for brides, says Pearson. She encourages its use. “It’s the best way to know exactly what the bride wants,” she says.

Themes are also a great way to begin the inspiration process. Sherri Norton, of Uptown Furniture and Floral, says themes are running from vintage to elegant, from “old maps as centerpieces with the old white vases” to a “glass mirror along with old blue mason jars” look. Because so many choices are available, couples are creating their own non-traditional looks, she adds.

GATHER YOUR COLORS
Gone are the days of matchy-match when it comes to wedding party flowers. Many brides, says Miers, use flowers as a contrast between the main bouquet and those of the attendants. While contrasting is popular, so is a semblance of complementing. Men’s boutonnières, she says, tend to coordinate their wedding party companion’s, mother-of-the-bride flowers blend with the bride’s, and other family members’ match the bridesmaids’.

Hydrangea, snowberry, sage, stock, dusty miller, English roses, seeded eucalyptus wrapped in vintage lace. Created by Modern Design & Concepts.

Hydrangea, snowberry, sage, stock, dusty miller, English roses, seeded eucalyptus wrapped in vintage lace. Created by Modern Design & Concepts.

As for the colors, it’s personal preference. Pearson notes brides are not requesting “any one color” and does arrangements in the entire range of the color spectrum. Teals, peaches, corals, and soft green are popular in lush, romantic looks, says Miers. Monotone white and ivory looks, especially with hydrangeas, along with hints of peach and pink are what Welke is seeing.

“One of the hottest color trends of the year is ombré,” says Norton. This involves graduated shades of a single color fading from light to dark. “It’s a perfect option for a couple who wants to use lots of different colors in their wedding, but in a more sophisticated way than rainbow colors offer,” she says.

GATHER YOUR FLOWERS
Once your flowers and colors are chosen, you need to decide on style. For the rustic, homegrown look, “canning jars are huge,” says Miers, especially those with a bluish tint. The jars can be hung on chairs during the ceremony and transferred to the table for the reception, often used in combination with old linens. For the reception, Pearson is seeing two varied height centerpieces. For example, a tall arrangement may grace half the tables in the room, while a low arrangement is placed on the others. Water-filled cylinders with floating candles remain popular as do flow- ers used to decorate the wedding cake, either mounded on top or set between the layers via a pedestal.

Popular bouquets, says Welke include “a nice mix of classical tradition with a touch of local garden appeal.” It’s a look that “lends itself to all of th

e lace adorned bridal dresses we are seeing,” she says. Typically, says Pear- son, attendant flowers are “a simpler version of the bride’s.”

Bouquet handles are a big. They can be wrapped in ribbon, embellished with jute or burlap, and feature a dangling brooch or chain, making “each bouquet a little bit different,” says Miers. Bouquets can also double as reception table décor, either in a vase or lying on their sides.

Purple hydrangea collared with green dianthus accented with peacock feathers. Created by Sargent's Floral.

Purple hydrangea collared with green dianthus accented with peacock feathers. Created by Sargent’s Floral.

GATHER YOUR PERSONAL TOUCH
It’s not hard to put your personal stamp on your wedding floral choices these days. Pearson sometimes decorates bouquets with personal items. Some brides, she says, bring a piece of fabric from their mother’s wedding dress to incorporate into their own flowers. Bling is also big. “We have been adorning everything from the napkins and vases to the bridal bouquet and pew sashes with bling,” says Welke. “Sometimes, it is a collection from the bride’s family jewelry box. Other times, we purchase in bulk to adorn the napkins.”

GATHER YOUR DAY
When all is said and done, no matter how and where you decorate your day with floral, the choice is yours. Color schemes and flower selections are vast, but with the help of a knowledgeable florist, your flowers can be as modern, vintage, bold, or soft as you like, and still be a perfect fit so your special day will blossom with fragrance, beauty, and meaning.